Friday, January 29, 2016

The Snowy Day

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this fun title with your child! 

The Snowy Day is appropriate for children age 2-8.
The Snowy Day

In The Snowy Day, written and illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats, join in the wintery adventures of Peter as he enjoys a snow day. Peter wakes up to his neighborhood covered in snow, he suits up and heads off for a day of forging tracks, building snowmen and making snow angels. He even made the perfect snowball and kept it in his pocket. You and your child will enjoy curling up under a blanket as you explore the beautiful pictures and simple story of The Snowy Day.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Take a Picture Walk:
Before you read The Snowy Day flip through the pages with your child, paying attention to the pictures on each page. As you flip through, without using any of the text, ask your child to tell you the story based on the pictures. 

Do this with your child:
Peter does all types of things as he's playing in the snow. If it's snowing where you live have your child try some of the things that Peter did; make different tracks, build a snowman, perfect their snowball. If it isn't snowing or you live in a more moderate climate, you can still do some of the movements with your child. They might enjoy making tracks in the mud and finding a stick to add to their tracks. You can show them how to make a snow angel on the carpet or hardwood floor. 

If you're interested in sharing The Snowy Day with your child you can find it from Puffin Books here. Please like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.

To learn more about Ezra Jack Keats, click here.

Friday, January 22, 2016

Poppleton in Winter

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this fun title with your child! 

Poppleton in Winter is a beginning chapter book appropriate for school age children.
Scholastic Reader Level 3: Poppleton In Winter

In Poppleton in Winter, written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Mark Teague, join Poppleton the pig in three winter stories. In the first story, Poppleton loves his house covered in icicles, but discover what happens when Patrick the finch accidentally knocks them all down. Then in the second, Poppleton decides to sculpt a bust of his friend and neighbor Cherry Sue. And in the third, find out why all of Poppleton's friends are too busy cooking to join him on a sleigh ride.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Inference:
As you read Poppleton in Winter ask your child to guess what they think will happen on the next page using the clues in the story. They will be making inferences based on what you have read and what the pictures tell them. 

Do this with your child:
There are 3 separate stories in Poppleton in Winter. Ask your child which was their favorite and why they chose that specific story. Then have them draw a picture to add a new winter adventure for Poppleton and his friends to take!

If you're interested in sharing Poppleton in Winter with your child you can find it from Scholastic Books here. Please like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.

To learn more about author Cynthia Rylant, visit her website.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Perritos en Invierno/A Winter's Tale

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this fun title with your child! 

Perritos en invierno/A Winter's Tail is appropriate for children age 4-8.

Join Martha and Skitsy as they share an adventure with their humans in Perritos en invierno/A Winter's Tail. Based on the characters created by Susan Meddaugh and adapted by Karen Barrs. Learn the story of why Skitsy is afraid of hockey pucks in this exciting story, written in both Spanish and English. 

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Cause and Effect:
As you read Perritos en invierno/A Winter's Tail ask your child to think about why the events in the story are happening. Why did Helen show Skits Mr. Chewy in the snow? Why was Ronald no longer mad after Skits took the hockey puck? Why did Martha and Helen go get Dad? These are all questions that will get your child thinking about how all actions have effects associated with them, this happened because of this. This strategy is called cause and effect.

Do this with your child:
Perritos en invierno/A Winter's Tail is in both Spanish and English. If you are comfortable in both languages read through the story twice, once in each language. If not, pick one page in the story to practice in the unfamiliar language. It will be a fun learning experience for you and your child!!

If you're interested in sharing Perritos en invierno/A Winter's Tail with your child you can find it from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt here. Please like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.

Friday, January 8, 2016


HAPPY NEW YEAR! Winter is upon us and in California, we're finally getting rain! FOR THE WEEKEND, share this fun title with your child! 

Rain is appropriate for children age 2-8.

Winter isn't always about snow! In the bright and bold Rain, written and illustrated by Manya Stojic, the animals in the hot dry land all sense that the rain is coming. Each animal can tell for a different reason, zebra can see it, rhino can feel it, and porcupine can smell it. Once the winter and rain are over, the hot dry land is transformed into a whole new landscape. Use your senses and explore the rain with the animals.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Retelling:
After you read Rain ask your child to take a turn and read the story to you. Retelling a story helps your child refine their understanding of the story, and helps them to develop concepts about words and books. As they're retelling, see if your child can correctly remember which animal used which of their senses to know that the rain is coming. 

Do this with your child:
Rain introduces the idea of using all of your senses to explore your surroundings. Each animal used a different sense to know that the rain was coming. Pick something in your home to explore with all of your senses as well. You can pick anything from play dough or  food or the couch or an ice cube, anything you can think of really. What does this object feel like, smell like, how does it sound, what does it look like, and if appropriate, what does this object taste like. If you want to take it one step further, record your observations with your child.

If you're interested in sharing Rain with your child you can find it from Dragonfly Books here. Please like them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.