Friday, September 22, 2017

How Do Dinosaurs Go to School

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

How Do Dinosaurs Go to School is appropriate for school age children.


Summary:
How Do Dinosaurs Go to School from Jane Yolen and Mark Teague is a hilarious addition to the How Do Dinosaurs series. Silly rhyming text paired with bright and fun illustrations combine to create a fun read aloud masterpiece. Follow along to discuss how dinosaurs arrive to school and their behavior in and around the classroom.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Take a Picture Walk:
How Do Dinosaurs Go to School is a great book for taking a picture walk. Before you read, flip through the pages with your reader and ask what they're seeing on each page. Do they recognize types of dinosaurs, do they recognize things from their own schoolyard and classroom, what do they think might be happening? By engaging with the book before reading they'll develop a deeper connection to the overall experience. You'll love laughing along as dinosaurs are put into everyday situations!

Do this with your child:

After you read How Do Dinosaurs Go to School talk with your reader about their favorite parts of the story. Ask them what other things it might be silly to see a dinosaur doing. Have them draw a picture of their favorite silly dino scenario.

If you're interested in sharing How Do Dinosaurs Go to School with your child you can find it from Scholastic here


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Friday, September 15, 2017

Ruby the Copycat

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

Ruby the Copycat is appropriate for school age children.

Image result for ruby the copycat

Summary:
Ruby the Copycat from Peggy Rathmann tells the story of Ruby in her new school. On Ruby's first day she sits behind Angela who is wearing a pretty red bow in her hair and when Ruby comes back from lunch she is wearing one too. When Angela wears a purple sweater with daisies on it, so does Ruby. Fortunately Ruby's teacher knows what to do. In a time when kids want to fit in, this story stands as an important reminder to be true to yourself!

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Retelling:
Ruby the Copycat is a great book to practice retelling. After you read the story, let your reader take a turn to tell it to you. Can they remember what is happening on the pages? Do they recognize any words or letters? It's okay if they tell you a completely different story! The desire is to further engage them with the entire book sharing process.

Do this with your child:

After you read Ruby the Copycat talk with your reader about why Ruby may have been copying Angela. Has your reader ever done anything to try to fit in too? Then talk about what makes your reader special and unique. Do they have any fun hobbies, favorite books, special outfits? 

If you're interested in sharing  Ruby the Copycat with your child you can find it from Scholastic here





Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, September 8, 2017

Late for School

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

Late for School is appropriate for school age children.


Summary:
Late for School is a lyrical adventure Smitty embarks on to make it to school on time. Smitty has never been late to school and black tar, a humongous whale, nor robots from Mars will stop him on his race to beat the school bell. Author Mike Reiss' rhythmic text paired with illustrator Michael Austin's vivid images are an exiting reminder that for some kids, getting to school on time can be quite the adventure!

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Sequencing:
Late for School is a great book to practice sequencing. Sequencing is putting events in order. After you read flip back through the pages with your child to and try to remember which event came next. Did it rain whole snowmen or did Smitty get swallowed by a whale first. Ask questions like this about the other events in the story as well. By taking a further look into the exciting events of the story your reader will become more engaged and have a more impactful experience overall.

Do this with your child:

After you read Late for School talk with your reader about what other crazy adventures might have gotten in Smitty's way on his race to school. Choose your favorite idea and draw a picture of that extra adventure together!

If you're interested in sharing  Late for School with your child you can find it from Peachtree Publishers here





Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, September 1, 2017

Rufus Goes to School

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

Rufus Goes to School is appropriate for children of all ages.


Summary:
Rufus Goes to School is a truly wonderful tale of Rufus Leeroy Williams III, a little pig who longs to go to school. Rufus is ready, he has his backpack and his favorite book, but the principal tells him "no pigs in school!" The next day Rufus tries again, this time he adds a lunch box to his collection of school goodies, but still the principal says no. A determined Rufus tries yet again, adding a blanket for naptime to his school supplies only to be met with another no from the principal. But when Rufus confesses his desire to learn to read, the principal understands. Kim T. Griswell delightful text pairs perfectly with Valeri Gorbachev's precious illustrations in this fun and charming back to school book.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Take a Picture Walk:
Before you read Rufus Goes to School flip through the pages with your reader. Have them tell you what they're seeing on each page, who are the characters, where are they, what are they doing. For older readers, take this a step further and ask what they think is happening, can they tell if a character is happy or sad, etc. Then as you read together, see if their thoughts and predictions they had during the picture walk were correct.

Do this with your child:

After you read Rufus Goes to School talk with your reader about being ready for school. What supplies do they have? Are they excited, eager, or nervous about the new school year? Then draw a picture together of their favorite part of the story. 

If you're interested in sharing Rusus Goes to School with your child you can find it from Sterling Publishing here



Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, August 25, 2017

Hoops

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

Hoops is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for hoops robert burleigh

Summary:
Hoops is a poetic understanding of basketball, the experience of the game, and the beauty of teamwork. Feel the rough roundness of the ball. Celebrate the soaring freedom of the dunk. Savor the moment when all eyes focus on the long three-pointer. Author Robert Burleigh and illustrator Stephen T. Johnson beautifully bring the rhythm of the basketball court to the pages of this book.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Making Connections:
After you read Hoops ask your reader questions about their own experiences with basketball. Have they ever played the sport, do they play on a team, do they know the rules? You can also make connections about spectating: have they ever watched a basketball game, do they have a favorite team, etc.? Do they know or play any other sports? Use this book as a jumping point to learn about more sports that they might want to know more about.

Do this with your child:

After you read Hoops try out the sport together! You can try making baskets, passing, and dribbling the ball. Head to a local outdoor court or park, play on a mini hoop of your own, and have fun!

If you're interested in sharing Hoops with your child you can find it from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt here



Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, August 18, 2017

Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this eclipse inspired title with your child. 

Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for going around the sun some planetary fun

Summary:
Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun is a wonderfully accurate description of our solar system set to the tune of 'Over in the Meadow.' Explore the planets as they orbit mother Sun, tilting, rolling and sparkling in space. Author Marianne Berkes provides the perfect introduction to our planetary neighbors and illustrator Janeen Mason's work will captivate audiences of all ages.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Retelling:
After you read Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun ask your reader to flip through and take a turn telling the story to you. Can they remember which planet sparkled or which tilted? By taking a more interactive role in the story telling process your reader will have a deeper connection to the entire experience.

Do this with your child:

After you read Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun talk with your child about the upcoming total solar eclipse, when the moon will completely block out the sun on Monday 8/21/2017. Check out Space Racers kid friendly website for resources, information, and activities and get ready for the exciting event!

If you're interested in sharing Going Around the Sun: Some Planetary Fun with your child you can find it from Dawn Publications here


Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, August 11, 2017

Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta!

FOR THE WEEKEND share this title with your child. 

Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta! is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for 9781570917943

Summary:
Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta! is a bilingual book using simple rhymes to counts from zero to fifteen in English and Spanish. Author Barbara Barbieri McGrath does a wonderful job coupling the counting storyline with interesting facts about soccer and it's history. Readers young and old will enjoy counting to fifteen while learning more about the popular sport.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Making Connections:
After you read Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta! ask your reader questions about their own experiences with soccer. Have they ever played the sport, do they play on a team, do they know he rules? You can also make connections about spectating, have they ever watched a soccer game, do they have a favorite team, etc.? Do they know or play any other sports? Use this book as a jumping point to learn about more sports that they might want to learn about.

Do this with your child:

After you read Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta! try out the sport together! You can try scoring goals against each other or have a more leisurely game of kicking the ball back and forth. 

If you're interested in sharing Soccer Counts! / !El futbol cuenta! with your child you can find it from Charlesbridge Publishing here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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