Friday, July 21, 2017

Super Sand Castle Saturday

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this summer title with your child. 

Super Sand Castle Saturday is appropriate for school age children.

Image result for super sandcastle saturday

Summary:
Super Sand Castle Saturday is a math reader which tells the story of a sand castle building competition between three friends. Larry the lifeguard will be judging sand castles to see who can build the tallest tower, deepest moat, and longest wall. As the kids build, they use their shovels and spoons to measure and compare. But they're all surprised when Larry the lifeguard brings out his measuring tape. This is a wonderful book form Stuart J. Murphy and Julia Gorton which effortlessly weaves the concept of measurement into a fun story.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Take a Picture Walk:
Before you read Super Sand Castle Saturday a look through the book with your reader, asking them to tell you what they see on each page. Ask about what is in the pictures, where do the kids seem to be, what are they doing, etc. Then as you read, see if the answers they came up with match what's happening in the story. By engaging with the story before reading, your child will be more interested and engaged as you read together.

Do this with your child:

After you read Super Sand Castle Saturday do some measuring with your reader. Try using different steps, baby steps and giant steps, to measure the hallway and talk about your results. Measure kitchen items like your table or counters using spoons or even bananas. Then bust out a measuring tape and measure each other! You'll be teaching your reader about the helpfulness of using standardized units of measurement in order to make more accurate comparisons, just like in the story. 

If you're interested in sharing Super Sand Castle Saturday with your child you can find it from Harper Collins Publishing here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, July 14, 2017

El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa / Little Hoo Goes to the Beach

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this summer title with your child. 

El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa/Little Hoo Goes to the Beach is appropriate for children of all ages.


Summary:
El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa/Little Hoo Goes to the Beach is a bilingual tale that tells the story of a scared owl and his trip to the beach. It is the perfect day to visit the beach but Little Hoo is afraid, the waves are big, the crabs might pinch and the sharks are plentiful. But with encouragement and exploration, Little Hoo discovers that the beach is actually not scary, but fun and exciting! Author Brenda Ponnay's simple text and bright and bold images pair together perfectly in this summer adventure.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Make Connections:
As you read El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa/Little Hoo Goes to the Beach ask your reader questions about their own experiences at the beach or in a new place. Have they been scared or nervous to try something new? How did they feel after they had their experience? Do they have advice for Little Hoo as he navigates his new adventure? By relating to the characters and the text, your reader will become more engaged in the story and have a more impactful experience overall.

Do this with your child:

After you read El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa/Little Hoo Goes to the Beach in the language that you are more comfortable with go back through and pick out some of the words you would like to learn in the other. Words like beach, ocean and waves are fun to know in any language!

If you're interested in sharing El Pequeño Hoo Va a la Playa/Little Hoo Goes to the Beach with your child you can find it from Xist Publishing here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, July 7, 2017

One Hot Summer Day

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this summer title with your child. 

One Hot Summer Day is appropriate for children of all ages.


Summary:
One Hot Summer Day brings the heat and the cool when a little girl plays outside on a hot, summer day. Follow along as the little girl explores the neighborhood with dogs panting and ladies holding umbrellas for shade as she teases her shadow and eats popsicles. Relief from the heat comes in big, dark thunderous clouds as a summer storm fills the sky. Nina Crews' simple text and photo-collage images radiate summer the whole way through.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Retelling:
After you read One Hot Summer Day ask your reader to take a turn and tell the story to you. Let them lead the way, flipping the pages and narrating the text and pictures. By engaging with the book in a more interactive role your reader will be more invested in the entire book sharing experience.

Do this with your child:

Before you read One Hot Summer Day set up a space to read together outside. This could be on a blanket in your back yard, at a local playground or park, or even at the beach. You will be able to ask your reader questions about how they're relating to the little girl in the story, are they too hot to swing, can they escape their shadow in the sunshine, etc. By engaging with a book in a new setting your reader will be experiencing it in a different way than when you share books on your couch or in bed. Take advantage of the summer weather 

If you're interested in sharing One Hot Summer Day with your child you can find it from Greenwillow Books, an imprint of Harper Collins Publishers, here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 30, 2017

All Kinds of Friends, Even Green

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. We are celebrating differences!

All Kinds of Friends, Even Green is appropriate for children of all ages.


Summary:
When Moses' teacher gives an assignment to write about a friend, he carefully thinks about all of his options. He has friends in his class who make him laugh and play with him on the playground, he has grown up friends like his mom and dad and teachers, he has friends who are neighbors like his babysitter Kate. When he thinks about Kate he knows what to do! Kate has two iguanas who are also his friends, and one iguana, Zaki, is missing toes. He decides to write about Zaki because just like him, Moses also has special needs. While Zaki has to figure out how to maneuver with his missing toes, Moses has to do the same thing in his wheelchair. All Kinds of Friends, Even Green does a wonderful job celebrating the differences we see in our everyday lives. Author Ellen B. Senisi captures a wonderfully diverse environment where readers can learn that living with a disability can be interesting and positive.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Take A Picture Walk:
All Kinds of Friends, Even Green is a delightful book to take a picture walk before reading. Flip through the pages with your reader and ask what they see on each page. This book is filled with photographs that capture a diverse classroom and neighborhood. Ask your child questions about what they're seeing on the pages, do they have any friends who look similar to the people in this book? By engaging with the book in a more interactive role your reader will be more invested in the entire book sharing experience.

Do this with your child:

After you read All Kinds of Friends, Even Green ask your child if they'd like to write or draw a project about one of their own friends just like Moses did. Let them think about which friend they might like to write about and assist them only if they ask.

If you're interested in sharing All Kinds of Friends, Even Green with your child you can find it from Woodbine House here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Same, Same But Different

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. We're celebrating differences in the month of June!

Same, Same but Different is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for same same but different

Summary:
Same, Same but Different follows the penpal relationship between two children in different countries. Elliot lives in America and Kailash lives in India. They write each other letters and send each other pictures to learn about each others homes and lives. They find out that even though their environments look different they both have families and homes and pets and hobbies. They aren't so different after all. Author Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw does a marvelous job connecting two characters who are oceans apart.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Making Connections:
Same, Same but Different is the perfect book to practice making connections. The entire story makes connections between Elliot and Kailash. As you read, ask your child how they are both similar and different from the children in the story. Books can be both a mirror where a child can see their own lives reflected as well as a window to outside worlds and experiences and Same, Same but Different is a wonderful example of both.

Do this with your child:

After you read Same, Same but Different ask your child if they would like to write a litter to a penpal. Students of the World is a wonderful, kid friendly website which connects students and children around the globe through letter writing. Check it out here.

Image result for penpals




If you're interested in sharing Same, Same but Different with your child you can find it from Henry Holt & Co here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Papa, Do You Love Me?

FOR THIS FATHER'S DAY WEEKEND, share this title with your child. 

Papa, Do You Love Me? is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for papa do you love me


Summary:
Papa, Do You Love Me? is a beautiful book to read this Father's Day. When a young boy in Africa asks his father if he loves him, he learns that his father's love is unconditional. Beautiful watercolor images from Barbara Lavallee and lyrical text from Barbara M. Joosse capture a bond that will translate across every culture.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Make Connections:
As you read Papa, Do You Love Me? ask you reader questions about their own relationship with their father (or stepfather or grandfather or big brother.) Even if you are not in the desert of Africa, your father will still do things to prove that he loves you. Talk with your child about what these things are in your family. By engaging with the book in  this way, your reader will build a deeper connection to the text and have a more impactful experience all together.


Do this with your child:

After you read Papa, Do You Love Me? have fun filling out this Father's Day questionnaire with your kiddos. Have them draw a picture of their dad and then ask them the questions and fill in their answers. It will make a Father's Day gift to treasure forever! 

If you're interested in sharing Papa, Do You Love Me? with your child you can find it from Chronicle Books here


Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 9, 2017

It's Okay to be Different

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. This month we are celebrating differences!

It's Okay to be Different is appropriate for children of all ages.



Summary:
It's Okay to be Different from author Todd Parr is a celebration of the diversity in the human race. Whether you have a different nose, you're a different color, or you have different abilities, Todd Parr's bright and fun illustrations and simple text remind us that it's okay! Acceptance, understanding and confidence all shine through in this wonderful and happy book.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Summarize:
After you read It's Okay to be Different ask you reader to tell you what the book was about. Can they tell you the overall idea/lesson that they learned while reading the book? Did they have a favorite part, or did they feel a connection to any of the people portrayed in the story? By engaging with the book in  this way, they will build a deeper connection to the text and have a more impactful experience all together.


Do this with your child:

After you read It's Okay to be Different try this fun experiment with your child! Have both a brown egg and a white egg. Talk with your child about what makes them different. Then crack them into a bowl. And talk about what they see. They'll find that even though they were different on the outside, they're made of the same things on the inside - just like all of us! 

If you're interested in sharing It's Okay to be Different with your child you can find it from Little Brown & Co here


Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.