Friday, June 23, 2017

Same, Same But Different

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. We're celebrating differences in the month of June!

Same, Same but Different is appropriate for children of all ages.

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Summary:
Same, Same but Different follows the penpal relationship between two children in different countries. Elliot lives in America and Kailash lives in India. They write each other letters and send each other pictures to learn about each others homes and lives. They find out that even though their environments look different they both have families and homes and pets and hobbies. They aren't so different after all. Author Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw does a marvelous job connecting two characters who are oceans apart.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Making Connections:
Same, Same but Different is the perfect book to practice making connections. The entire story makes connections between Elliot and Kailash. As you read, ask your child how they are both similar and different from the children in the story. Books can be both a mirror where a child can see their own lives reflected as well as a window to outside worlds and experiences and Same, Same but Different is a wonderful example of both.

Do this with your child:

After you read Same, Same but Different ask your child if they would like to write a litter to a penpal. Students of the World is a wonderful, kid friendly website which connects students and children around the globe through letter writing. Check it out here.

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If you're interested in sharing Same, Same but Different with your child you can find it from Henry Holt & Co here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

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Friday, June 16, 2017

Papa, Do You Love Me?

FOR THIS FATHER'S DAY WEEKEND, share this title with your child. 

Papa, Do You Love Me? is appropriate for children of all ages.

Image result for papa do you love me


Summary:
Papa, Do You Love Me? is a beautiful book to read this Father's Day. When a young boy in Africa asks his father if he loves him, he learns that his father's love is unconditional. Beautiful watercolor images from Barbara Lavallee and lyrical text from Barbara M. Joosse capture a bond that will translate across every culture.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Make Connections:
As you read Papa, Do You Love Me? ask you reader questions about their own relationship with their father (or stepfather or grandfather or big brother.) Even if you are not in the desert of Africa, your father will still do things to prove that he loves you. Talk with your child about what these things are in your family. By engaging with the book in  this way, your reader will build a deeper connection to the text and have a more impactful experience all together.


Do this with your child:

After you read Papa, Do You Love Me? have fun filling out this Father's Day questionnaire with your kiddos. Have them draw a picture of their dad and then ask them the questions and fill in their answers. It will make a Father's Day gift to treasure forever! 

If you're interested in sharing Papa, Do You Love Me? with your child you can find it from Chronicle Books here


Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 9, 2017

It's Okay to be Different

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. This month we are celebrating differences!

It's Okay to be Different is appropriate for children of all ages.



Summary:
It's Okay to be Different from author Todd Parr is a celebration of the diversity in the human race. Whether you have a different nose, you're a different color, or you have different abilities, Todd Parr's bright and fun illustrations and simple text remind us that it's okay! Acceptance, understanding and confidence all shine through in this wonderful and happy book.

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Summarize:
After you read It's Okay to be Different ask you reader to tell you what the book was about. Can they tell you the overall idea/lesson that they learned while reading the book? Did they have a favorite part, or did they feel a connection to any of the people portrayed in the story? By engaging with the book in  this way, they will build a deeper connection to the text and have a more impactful experience all together.


Do this with your child:

After you read It's Okay to be Different try this fun experiment with your child! Have both a brown egg and a white egg. Talk with your child about what makes them different. Then crack them into a bowl. And talk about what they see. They'll find that even though they were different on the outside, they're made of the same things on the inside - just like all of us! 

If you're interested in sharing It's Okay to be Different with your child you can find it from Little Brown & Co here


Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.

Friday, June 2, 2017

A Rainbow of Friends

FOR THE WEEKEND, share this title with your child. This month we are celebrating differences!

A Rainbow of Friends is appropriate for children of all ages.



Summary:
A Rainbow of Friends from author P.K. Hallinan celebrates the differences that make all people special. Friends come in all colors and sizes. They may be funny or serious, athletes or stars, shy or outgoing. But no matter our differences we can work together and be kind kind to each other. This book is wonderful reminder to celebrate our differences together!

Practice this Comprehension Strategy-Make Connections:
After you read A Rainbow of Friends take the time to talk with your child about their own friends. Is everybody exactly the same? Do they have friends, like the ones on the book, with different talents, different abilities, different clothes? When a reader is able to engage with a story in a personal way they will be more invested in the text and the entire book sharing experience.

Do this with your child:

After you read A Rainbow of Friends have you child draw apicture of their friends all together. Ask them to include something about each friend that makes them different and special. When they're done, you can make copies of the picture for your child to share with their friends!

If you're interested in sharing A Rainbow of Friends with your child you can find it from GuidepostBooks here

Click here to learn more about Raising A Reader and the work we do to promote early literacy and family engagement. 

Stay connected with us on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Pinterest.